Richard Brooks - Reflective Journal

Richard Brooks - Reflective Journal

About the Artist RWB Journal

My work is informed by my personal faith, sense of vulnerability, bereavement, and, my personal experience.

My practice centres on addressing social justice issues of the human condition. I avoid making work of any individual person; so that neither, is the individual stigmatised, nor is the work unduly personalised.

Since January 2012 I have used this blog as part of my reflective journal.
Included in this journal is some of my documentation of my research; the underlined text provides links to web pages etc that have formed part of my research.
The Research Visits category includes some responses to gallery visits.

17 January 2013: Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery

Research VisitPosted by Richard Thu, January 24, 2013 15:58:22
I had a really inspiring and thought provoking visit, that had three distinct elements

1. 19th Century paintings in the round room

In particular I was moved by one particular painting:

Never Morning Wore to Evening But Some Heart Did Break, Walter Langley 1824

http://www.bmagprints.org.uk/image/407587/walter-langley-never-morning-wore-to-evening-but-some-heart-did-break

2. Revealed Government Art collection

18 months ago I had viewed a previous rendition of this show [At Whitechapel Gallery, London]. It was interesting how different the show appeared in a new setting and configoration. This provides much food for thought as I contemplate not only how to best configure my degree show in August, but also how to best install my work at a solo pop up exhibition this weekend in Ipswich [at Landseer rd Methodist Church].

The work that this time was especially captivating was Ori Gersht's Being There: White Mountain, 2001

http://www.gac.culture.gov.uk/work.aspx?obj=31487

3. The Private View of Arrow in the Blue, the first west Midlands Koestler Trust exhibition http://www.koestlertrust.org.uk/pages/midlands13/exhibitionmid13.html

I found the whole show moving and inspiring but Released was especially poignant.

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